Paul Green's MSP Marketing Podcast

Episode 81: Is this a safe time to put up prices?

Paul Green's MSP Marketing Podcast
Episode 81: Is this a safe time to put up prices?
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In this week’s episode

  • You know you’ve got to do it at some point, but are you nervous about putting up your prices? Especially during these challenging times? This week Paul explains how and when you should make an increase
  • Also on the show this week – you could win an incredible prize. Listen to find out how to win a brand new smart watch
  • Plus listen for a list of the best qualifying questions to ask prospects. And Paul’s special guest talks about how they closed their break/fix business to start an MSP

Show notes

Episode transcription

Voiceover:
Fresh every Tuesday for MSPs around the world. This is Paul Green’s MSP Marketing Podcast.

Paul Green:
Hello, and welcome back to the podcast. Here’s what we’ve got coming up for you this week.

Nancy Sabino:
Oh, my God. That was hard. We went from a list of 300 businesses that we worked with on a break/fix basis. We got it down to 10.

Paul Green:
Plus, we’re going to be talking about the best qualification questions that you can ask your prospects. You’ve only got a finite amount of time on this world, you might as well invest it into talking to the people most likely to go on to become clients of yours. Plus, we’re going to start a brand new thing in the show where we give things away. Every couple of weeks or so, we’ll have a competition with some cool stuff for you to win. Today, we’re giving away a brand new GPS smartwatch. I’ll tell you how you can win later in the show.

Voiceover:
Paul Green’s MSP Marketing Podcast.

Paul Green:
Now here’s an intriguing question. Should you or should you not put your prices up? And I appreciate there are so many different factors that come into play when you’re having a conversation like this. I believe that for the vast majority of MSPs, you should. You should put your prices up at least on an annual basis because your costs are going up on an annual basis. But I also appreciate that we’re in very unusual times right now. We’re kind of on the edge of coming towards post pandemic. Maybe that’s a bit early to make a call like that, but certainly, by the end of this year, things are going to be more normal than they’ve been for two years.

Paul Green:
And we’ve all looked at the weird things that have happened to businesses and economies and all sorts of stuff over the last couple of years. And if you’re exposed to retail and hospitality businesses, you’d be crazy to put your prices up. Those guys are just surviving right now. But if you’re looking after lots of other kinds of businesses or just general businesses, maybe, just maybe, this is a good time to put prices up. I think there are two types of price rise that you need to look at. You need to look at your existing clients completely separately to how you look at your new clients. So for your existing clients, that’s where I think you need to tread a little more carefully with your price rises. I mean, costs do go up. That’s absolutely fine. But the thing with existing clients, you have to take the bigger picture. You have to look at what are we doing here to make sure we retain this client. The longer that the client stays with you, the more opportunity there is for you to sell them something else.

Paul Green:
In fact, sometimes I discuss with my MSP clients that they can introduce a price increase by stealth just by selling something else to their existing clients and putting a bit of extra margin on that. So rather than actually saying, “Hey, our prices are going up. It’s going up from this to this.” When they sell them an extra service, they bundle extra margin on top and there is their price increase. It’s a stealth price increase. I think you have to look at price increases with your clients and just look at the context of how are they doing right now. If they’re doing really well, then don’t be scared of introducing reasonable price increases. And you must always be reminding them that the cost of doing business and the costs of the amazing services and tools that you buy in, those costs are going up on a regular basis. And therefore that needs to be reflected.

Paul Green:
Most decent clients understand that you need to make good profit on their work. Otherwise, your financial and mental, your psychological motivation to continue to work for them will drop. And as I say, the best clients think that. The not the best clients, they don’t tend to think that way, they just want everything kind of cheaper. So I think you have to look at each client individually and say, “Who can absorb a price increase? Who are we going to have to increase the prices using stealth and who are we essentially going to subsidise?”

Paul Green:
In fact, you might go to some of the businesses that you’re looking after that you know who have had it tough over the last year or so. You might say to those guys, “Do you know what? We’re due to put the prices up. We’re going to give you a price freeze for the next two to three years because that’s our way of supporting you and helping you guys get back on your feet.” That would be an amazing thing to do. It would be great for your retention to do that for some of your clients that they’ve been struggling.

Paul Green:
Now, the other aspect of putting up prices is for new clients. Should you be putting up your prices for new clients? Absolutely you should. Absolutely, because new clients don’t know what the price was yesterday. So someone who you’re talking to today and you’ve put a quotation or a proposal in, they don’t know if you’re charging more today than you were yesterday. In fact, I would say for new clients joining you, you should be nudging the prices up constantly. You sign a new client today, tomorrow you nudge the prices up just a little bit. What’s an extra pound or an extra dollar per user per month? Because what will happen is, the marketplace will find the point you’re too expensive. You don’t really want clients who pick you because you’re cheaper than your competitors. You really, really don’t. The best place to be in any marketplace is at the very top of the marketplace where you’re the most expensive, you’re the highest quality. You will tend to attract the very best clients.

Paul Green:
People who want to pay bottom dollar, typically, not always, but typically turn out to be nightmare clients. You don’t want to attract those people. You want to repel those people. You don’t even want them inquiring to you. A client who switches from their incumbent MSP to you on price alone is just commoditising what you do for them. And they will never ever be a good client. You’ll always struggle to sell them more stuff and grow their value and add more monthly recurring revenue per user. So don’t let clients come to you because you are cheap or because you’re reasonable. Nudge up your prices, nudge up your quality. In fact, this should be the goal. It should be really.

Paul Green:
We’re constantly nudging up the prices and improving and increasing the quality so we can justify those prices, but along the way, we become the best in the area. The greatest quality in the area. Let the time-wasters who want to pay very little go to your competitors. In fact, give them the name of your direct competitor, the people who you want to waste their time and send your worst prospects, your bottom dollar prospects to them.

Paul Green:
You’re looking for clients where price is a factor, but it’s not the only factor. And yes, that means being one of the most expensive MSPs in the marketplace. The very best clients are looking for that partnership. They’re looking for that peace of mind. They’re looking for someone that they can work with for five to 10 years or more. They want people right at the very top because they understand that when you pay for a proper service, you get decent people, good people doing a good job. And anyone, anyone that thinks they can pay 20, $30 or pounds a month and get a top end service and all the protection and all the services, these guys are jokers. I know there’s plenty of them out there. But you really don’t want to waste your time with them. You want clients where price is a factor, not the factor.

Paul Green:
Now, you do have to demonstrate value. Just because clients are willing to pay a little bit more for a high quality MSP doesn’t mean they don’t want a good deal. Everyone wants a good deal. But the trick is to demonstrate value. You’ve essentially got to justify the price that you’re charging. Now, there are a number of ways that you can do that. My favourite way is to surround them with an abundance of social proof. So before a sales meeting, you’d send them a case studies book talking about a lot of the clients you’ve worked with. You’d perhaps send them over a video of testimonials from your existing clients.

Paul Green:
All of your marketing materials, especially your website, should have case studies and testimonials all over it. You should have great reviews on Google, on Facebook, on all the other platforms that are important to you. And when your potential future clients see that dozens of other people trust you, it makes you safer. When you’re safer, they’re more willing to pay for it. Everyone is willing to pay the price if it’s safe and if they can see the chances are high they’ll get the value that they’ve been looking for.

Paul Green:
The other thing that you could do is you could use the good, better, best approach to leverage pricing psychology. So good, better, best is where you offer three options, like a bronze, silver, gold. This can work very, very well because it gives people the perception of choice. They look at the bronze package and the price. Then they look at the silver package, which is a bit more comprehensive and a higher price. And then the gold again is even more comprehensive and has a higher price than the silver. And what this allows people to do is to compare. Because people who don’t understand technology, which is basically everyone that’s buying from you, if they don’t understand it, how can they know that your package is better than your competitor’s package? They don’t know. They can’t compare apples to apples. They’re comparing apples to oranges, which is crazy. And they’re going to make the wrong decision. So by offering them a good, better, best choice, you allow them to compare the packages that you offer.

Paul Green:
Your bronze package should be the bare minimum of what you would let a client get away with buying. Your gold package should be absolutely the very, very best. And your silver package, the one in the middle, should be the one that you really, really want people to buy. Because eight times out of 10, someone will look at a good, better, best package, and they will go for the middle option because it’s better than the bronze option, but it’s not quite as extravagant as the gold option. Essentially, you put the option that you most want to sell into the middle.

Paul Green:
The other way that you can do this is just bundle everything into one price. It’s literally an all you can eat, everything you need in one price package. And you just say to them, “Hey, it’s this much per user per month.” however else you price it, and that’s it. “And yes, if you compare this to any of our competitors, we will come out the most expensive, but we’ve put literally everything in there that you could possibly need. And it’s all in there for this price per user per month.” Now, you may actually split the bundles out on the invoice. I always think that’s a good idea to have at least three lines on your invoice. The three lines being support, security, and telecoms. But in terms of that kind of headline figure when you’re trying to hook someone in, then bundling everything together into one price can be a clever way to do it. All of these are just ways that we can justify putting the prices up.

Paul Green:
But for new clients, you absolutely should be just nudging that up all the time. Keep adding that extra pound or dollar per user per month, or per device per month, however you sell it. And eventually, the marketplace will tell you when you’re too expensive. That’s the point you come down a dollar or down a pound, and you know that you found the top of the market. You can be the most expensive MSP in your market, attracting the very best clients. And the market tells you when you’ve got there.

Voiceover:
Here’s this week’s clever idea.

Paul Green:
One of the ways to spot those very best clients or prospects, the ones where price is a factor not the factor, is to ask them the right pre-qualifying questions during the sales process. And you can do this either at your initial 15-minute conversation with them or you can do it when you’re having bigger conversations with them, perhaps meeting them in person. The reason to ask qualifying questions is to ascertain what kind of quality of prospects are they. Because not all prospects are equal. And believe me, your time on this planet is limited enough as it is. You don’t want to be spending more of your time talking to the wrong people. People who are just tire-kickers, they’re just trying to get a price because they need get three quotes because their boss asked them. Or, they’re not really the decision maker, or they’re just not really engaged or interested, or they’re just trying to find something to beat down the price, the renewal price of their incumbent MSP.

Paul Green:
So what I’m going to give you here isn’t an exhaustive list, but it’s a series of questions that you can ask every prospect to qualify how good they are whether or not it’s worth you investing time and energy and money warming them up and ultimately moving them to becoming a client. And you might want to keep a list of these next to your laptop, or… What am I saying? You wouldn’t print something off, would you? Stick it in your OneNote. Stick these questions in your OneNote so whenever you’re having an initial prospect meeting, these are the questions you can ask.

Paul Green:
The very first one is, “How did you hear about us?” Now, that isn’t just a kind of a market research question to know how they ended up on your website. You essentially want to know, are they a warm prospect or are they cold? For example, if someone says, “Oh, well my friend, Dave, he uses you and recommended you.” You know that the chances of you winning the business is very, very high because a referral, a recommendation is the best kind of new leads you can get. It’s just not something you can drive particularly aggressively. Whereas if someone has just clicked on an advert literally 13 seconds ago and then they’ve picked up the phone and called you, you could argue that that’s a less warm prospect. If someone’s looked at your website or if they’ve been in your email list or they’ve read your book, or they’ve seen you on a webinar, or they’ve heard you on a podcast or something like that, all of these things, warm people up that make them better prospects.

Paul Green:
I think the next question you should follow up with is, “Are you the decision maker?” Or maybe a more subtle way to put it is, “Who else needs to be involved in making a decision about which IT support company you use?” Now, if they can’t make a decision from you, if they’re not the decision maker, don’t waste your time talking to them. Sure, there are lots of influences out there. The influencer is someone who influences the decision maker. And you’ve got to be careful not to kind of push away an influencer because they could essentially be the gatekeeper to the decision maker. But you need to know who it is that you are talking to. The vast majority of the time, I would say probably about 80% of the time, there’s only ever really one decision maker. And fairly early on in the process, you need to figure out who that person is and make sure that you are actually talking to them. Do not ever, ever think that an influencer can represent your business in the way that you can.

Paul Green:
Some companies, they like to send out the influencers to gather the information to do all the difficult work of talking to potential suppliers. And then, what is essentially years and years of your life and experience in your work which you managed to summarise for someone within a 60, 90 minute process, they’re going to try and summarise that pretty cold to their boss in five minutes. We all know that’s not going to go well. So you always want to be talking to the decision maker where you can.

Paul Green:
The next thing to figure out is you kind of want to figure out what problems they’ve got. Or you might ask, “What is it that got you to contact us today?” Essentially, you’re trying to find out what problems they’ve got. What are their needs right now? What are their wants right now? What fears have they got? People who need something tend to make pretty poor buying decisions. Because the need is just something you need. “If you need a car, just get a cheap car.”

Paul Green:
But of course, most buying decisions, and I include business buying decisions in these, are not made purely on needs. They’re made on wants. “I need a car, but I want a great big BMW. I need a laptop, but I want an 1,800 pound or dollar Surface Pro.” You get the idea, yeah? So we’re kind of more interested in what they want, not just talk about their needs, but we want to ask them questions, qualifying questions, which are big, open questions. What questions, how questions, asking those to find out what they really want. And particularly, we want to know what fears have they got. The very best MSPs are constantly removing fears of prospects. You find out what is going to keep them awake at night, or you educate them about what they should be lying in bed at night worrying about. And then you take those fears away for them.

Paul Green:
The next qualifying question should be, “Do you currently have an IT support company?” You don’t want to be someone’s first MSP. I guess it’s like being their first boyfriend or being someone’s first girlfriend. You don’t want that. You want someone who’s already got experience of working with an MSP. Because if they’ve never worked with an IT support company before, that’s probably because they’re too small or they’ve done it all in house or whatever the reason. 99 times out of 100, you want someone who’s switching from an incumbent over to you. So you kind of want to ask them is, “Have you got an IT support company right now? Who are they?” It’s up to you whether or not you ask who that is because you may not know them anyway.

Paul Green:
But here’s what you would ask. “On a scale of one to 10 where 1 is awful and 10 is amazing, what score would you give your current IT support company?” Because if they score them a 10, 9 or an 8, they’re actually very happy with their IT support company and they’re probably not going to switch. They’re probably just looking around to make sure that they’re getting the best value from their incumbent. If they answer a 7, a 6 or a 5, there is a level of dissatisfaction in there. They may switch, but they may also sign a new contract with their incumbents. You’re going to have to work hard on that one. Whereas if they answer 4 or below, that is a deeply dissatisfied client and they are yours for the taking. Go in, work it well, use lots of social proof and steal that client.

Paul Green:
A question that goes hand in hand with that is, “What made you call us? What made you interested in us? What made you potentially choose us?” You’re looking for the clues, the things that are driving them and their decision making. Because it’s never what you think it is. You think that, “Oh, well, they’re just looking for the best IT support company around.” And they’re not. They’re looking for a very specific thing. It’s just sometimes they don’t know that they’re looking for a very specific thing. So you’ve got to kind of tease that out of them. “What made you interested in us? What made you choose to contact us?” And then I think the final question that you could ask in this initial batch of prospect qualifying questions is, “How quickly will you be ready to move? How quickly are you ready to switch from your other IT support company to us?” And that’s kind of a way of saying, “Hey, when are you out of contract?” Or, “How urgent is this?”

Paul Green:
If they say, “Well, we’re in contract for another six months” don’t be despondent by that. That means actually they’re researching very early on. This is great. You’ve got six months now to build a relationship with them and get them signed up so that you can then take over from their ex in a few months time or when the contract’s up or whatever is the case. But essentially, you want to put some time on this, because time can be an amazing sales tool. I mean, you can use scarcity of time to get more sales. When there’s a deadline for something that can work very, very powerfully for you, especially when it’s their own deadline. Nothing gets more action than a business that’s got its own deadline. But trying to find out what should happen when is a very powerful way to qualify that prospect.

Paul Green:
Look, these are only just a few questions. There are loads and loads of other questions. You could just Google. “What kind of questions should I be asking prospects?” But whatever you do, settle on a set of standard questions that you ask every prospect early on in the conversation just as you’re learning about their business to help you qualify whether or not this is a great prospect or someone who’s going to be a time waster.

Voiceover:
Paul Green’s MSP Marketing Podcast.

Paul Green:
Something new that we’re doing in the podcast is giving away cool stuff. We’ve been working very hard behind the scenes to put together some really cool prizes for you. In every sort of three or four weeks or so here on the podcast, we’ll give you an opportunity to win something cool. Today, we kick that off with our very first giveaway.

James Lett:
Hey, this is producer James. Yes. Will you be this week’s winner? I’m always here to make Paul sound good, but also right now tell you about this week’s incredible smart watch prize. It’s a Ticwatch Pro 3 GPS, running Android’s WearOS. I think it looks way better than an Apple Watch. It’s got incredible features to make you more productive, track your fitness, but also help you to disconnect when you need to. I’ve actually got one of these myself. It really is one of the best smartwatches around at the moment. And for you listening to Paul’s podcast, can exclusively enter to win by visiting this special private page. Right now, go to paulgreensmspmarketing.com/win. Just put in your details. A winner will be picked at random after closing at midnight UK time on Sunday, 6th of June, 2021. So good luck. Enter to win that Ticwatch Pro 3 GPS. And for all the rules, once more, go to paulgreensmspmarketing.com/win.

Voiceover:
The big interview.

Nancy Sabino:
Hi, there. I am Nancy Sabino, CEO and co-founder of SabinoCompTech, a small MSP out of Houston, Texas.

Paul Green:
Nancy, we first met in The Tech Tribe where you described your story when you joined a few months ago and you were telling all the other members of The Tech Tribe, of which there are many, many, many members, you are telling them your story and how you’ve set up this business and how you’ve grown this business. It was such a great story. I knew instantly I had to get you on my podcast and get you talking about this because I think you could be quite an inspirational person for the thousands of MSPs that will be listening to this. So tell us how you got started with your MSP.

Nancy Sabino:
First off, thank you. Thank you so much for the kind words. I love that. So the MSP, my husband and I started it about five years ago. We had a first business together that we started when we were 22, and that was more so of a break/fix, Geek Squad type of model. In 2015, I got accepted into the Goldman Sachs Program where I learned first time that I had any kind of classes business wise or anything along those lines and so, that kind of got me thinking that we needed to change gears. Our career paths were not exactly where we wanted them to be. And so we realised, “Let’s do something else” and we jumped ship and started the MSP, which is just more fitting for what we were wanting to do in life in general.

Paul Green:
Essentially, did you go from a 100% break/fix and sort of leave that as it was and start a new thing? Or did you try and transfer your break/fix clients over?

Nancy Sabino:
The majority of our clients were residential at the time. And we had to close the residential doors first off, then we did have some break/fix customers. We went from a list of 300 businesses that we worked with on a break/fix basis. We got it down to 10 that we were able to convert over when we first started this journey. It was definitely a lot of income loss in those times. But we did it carefully and we tried to make steps where it wasn’t going to be too painful for us or our employees because we wanted to keep everyone as well, or for our clients. We wanted to find homes for everybody essentially. So those that weren’t going to convert over, we gave them a deadline essentially. That way, we were also able to convert as many as possible and then also look for new clients that would fit our new model now.

Paul Green:
Well, that makes perfect sense. What did it feel like to make that decision that you’re going to dump this business that you’ve been working on for some time and start a completely different business? How did you actually make that decision? What was the process you went through?

Nancy Sabino:
Oh my God, that was hard. That decision, I think it had been brewing for some time. And then the first day of the Goldman Sachs Program, we talked about exit strategies. I realised that to exit the residential business was not necessarily failure. It was going in a different direction. And so, that’s essentially what kind of let me know it’s okay, it’s not failure, which is the one thing that I was fighting against, obviously, feeling like I had failed. It was definitely difficult because so many of our clients were older and it was hard to leave them behind as well. That was some of the major pain points when making that decision, but ultimately realising that it didn’t fit who we were as people any longer and it didn’t fit what we wanted out of our life.

Paul Green:
I love this because you’ve linked the business to your life. So many business owners go through the day-to-day things they have to do in the business without actually ever asking, “Is this getting me to the lifestyle that I want to lead?” Now, Nancy, you’ve mentioned a couple of times the Goldman Sachs Program. Well, I’ve actually done exactly the same program. It’s called 10,000 Small Businesses sponsored by Goldman Sachs. It always struck me as slightly odd that an enormous bank, which was in the news just to… I don’t know if it was in the states, but certainly in the UK just a few weeks ago, it was in the news because new staff who started Goldman Sachs have to work 80 to 100 hour weeks which is insane. But they do put on an amazing program. And I did it. It’s either seven or eight years ago. I can’t quite remember now.

Paul Green:
I could pretty much look back at when I did that I made the decision to sell my business. And which I did. I sold that business in 2016. So I can understand, it sounds like you and I did exactly the same program where it’d be you did one in Texas and I did one in Birmingham in the UK. What were some of the other things that you picked up from that program which have helped you to develop this new MSP now?

Nancy Sabino:
Well, they talked about focus. That was one thing that I took to heart. I wanted to focus solely on what we were good at. And so, we essentially found our niche. And because of that, we’ve stuck by it, which is difficult at times, especially when you have people that are wanting to give you business and you have to turn them away because they’re not an ideal client or projects that seem like, “Oh my God, theirs are going to be a game changer” or something along those lines. We realised that it’s not really going to fit into our business model now. And so, saying no to that business or turning that away has been painful. But that’s the one thing that I learned through the program is that you kind of have to stick to your guns and know that if you are building a certain business model and you’re focusing on your expertise, it’s going to work out in the end.

Paul Green:
And you mentioned having a niche or a niche as I would call it, or a vertical, which is such an important marketing strategy. What is your niche? Are you still 100% focused on that?

Nancy Sabino:
Our niche is compliance. It’s not the same as when we originally started, because we’ve realised that there’s more industries that have compliance means. And so, it started off with just private healthcare and accounting. We moved that into manufacturing because they also have compliance needs. And so, instead of just saying we have a focus on X vertical, Y vertical, it’s more so the umbrella of compliance.

Paul Green:
That makes perfect sense. And that’s still a vertical, it’s still a great niche because you’re honing a set of technical skills within the business, which obviously you can apply to all these different sectors because the thing they all share is that they all regulated. So you restarted then five years ago. How have the last five years gone for it?

Nancy Sabino:
Oh, it’s gone great. But with any business story, there’s always the ups and downs. So I would have to say overall, great. There’s not a challenge that we haven’t been able to overcome. And right now, we’re at a point where I’m actually in an accelerator program. We’re looking to scale up at this moment in time.

Paul Green:
That’s really good. I love the fact that you’ve still got more growth in your mind. As we’ve been speaking now, I have just gone back into The Tech Tribe, which is where we first met. And I hope you don’t mind me just mentioning some of the things that you’ve won along the way. In just five years, you’ve made it to number 41 on the MSP 501 list. You’ve won Digi Master. You’ve won MSP of the Year. You’ve won Women of the Channel as well, and NextGen Leader. I think you’ve been doing a pretty good job, Nancy, don’t you?

Nancy Sabino:
Yes.

Paul Green:
I know it’s not just about the awards, but the awards I think sometimes, they’re a great way of recognising success. Let’s finish off with just one more thing from you, Nancy. If you were to pick something that you’ve learned in the last couple of years, whether that was on the Goldman Sachs Program or from giving up a business in order to have a different business and fulfil a different lifestyle, or maybe it’s just from what you’ve been doing over the last five years rapidly growing your MSP, what’s a piece of advice that you’d give to any other MSP?

Nancy Sabino:
One of the things that I have fallen in love with in this industry is actually the marketing of it, which is kind of funny because I’m talking to you. But, I would say that one of the things that I absolutely loved was just being able to show who we are across our marketing, which is something that for so long we hid in our first business because of the fact that we were so young. I didn’t want to do that going into this business. And I have been completely just 100% clear and honest and just authentic when it comes to our marketing and what we put in it, and that has helped tremendously when it comes to how people relate to us. And so, I would give the advice of, when it comes to your marketing, have it speak for you as to who you are because others are going to relate to that.

Paul Green:
So by being authentic, which is a great choice of words. You mean being yourself, but putting yourself into the marketing.

Nancy Sabino:
Yes, absolutely.

Paul Green:
And is that difficult to do? Because many MSPs don’t want to be the front person of the business. You obviously are the front person of your business. Have you found that difficult? Or actually, are you more comfortable because you’re just being Nancy?

Nancy Sabino:
It didn’t start off so comfortable. I have social anxiety. And so, it was definitely something that I had to work on in order to put myself into our branding and into who we are as a company. It didn’t start off so comfortable, but it definitely gets more comfortable as I allow myself to just be myself.

Paul Green:
That’s wonderful. And your marketing must be working because rapid growth doesn’t come just from being a good business and doing what you do. You’ve got to be able to communicate that out to other people, so well done. Nancy, thank you so much for coming on the podcast.

Nancy Sabino:
Great.

Paul Green:
I really do appreciate it. And thanks to Nigel from The Tech Tribe for the introduction between the two of us. Where can we learn a little bit more about you and about your business?

Nancy Sabino:
You could head on over to our website, sabinocomptech.com or nancysabino.com. You can also find me on LinkedIn and Instagram because I am a millennial and I love Instagram, or any of the other social networks.

Voiceover:
Paul Green’s MSP Marketing Podcast. This week’s recommended book.

Justin:
What’s up everybody? I’m Justin from the Virtua Consulting Group. Being the self promoter that I am and the business person I am, Paul, I’m sorry to do this, I got to recommend my own book. You can check out my book, Appitalize on Your Idea: Bringing Any Idea to Fruition. It’s available on Amazon. Just search for it or search my name and you’ll be able to find it.

Voiceover:
Coming up next week.

Ernest Murray:
Hey, this is Ernest Murray with Genuine Technology Group. And next week, I’m going to tell you about our unique pricing and bundling model so don’t miss next week’s show.

Paul Green:
We’re also going to be talking about how you can protect your quarterly business reviews, or strategic reviews as I prefer to call them. How you can protect them from current problems that you’ve got with your clients? So let’s say you’ve got some outstanding tickets or there’s some things that are just dragging on, how do you stop those from affecting your ability to sell more to your existing clients? We’ll talk about that next week. We’re also going to talk about the offline marketing tools that you should be using. Surely, online tools are kind of easy. It’s Google, it’s Facebook, it’s your website, it’s your email list, but there are a load of offline marketing tools that not so many MSPs use and they are incredibly powerful. I’ll tell you what they are and what you can do with them in next week’s show. See you then.

Voiceover:
Made in the UK for MSPs around the world, Paul Green’s MSP Marketing Podcast.

 


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